What do banks do?

Put simply, banks provide services for people or organisations who want to borrow, lend and invest money. They are often huge, complex organisations that play a part in the lives of people in every corner of the world, with clients ranging from individuals to businesses, and even the governments and central banks of entire countries.

Explore

Where could you fit in?

It’s an exciting time to join the finance sector. Technology and innovation are pushing the limits of what banking can achieve. It means banks like ours are bringing together new skills and different perspectives to innovate, progress and make a positive difference. It’s a mind-set that’s true wherever you work - from technology and finance through to wealth management and corporate finance. Find out where a career in banking could take you.

What is Sales, Trading & Structuring?

When people think of investment banking, they tend to imagine the trading floor. Although sales, trading and structuring is just one part of a bank’s work, it is where a lot of its commercial activities take place.

In simple terms, traders buy and sell products like debt (bonds) and commodities (like oil and natural gas) and execute foreign exchange deals to make an incremental profit and/or hedge risk. At Deutsche Bank, roles in our FIC (Fixed Income and Currencies) business can largely be broken down into three areas:

What would you like to see?

Division overview
Jargon busters
What skills you need
What our graduates think

Division overview

Sales

Sales

Sales people are in touch with institutions, corporates and private individuals, suggesting appropriate investment opportunities, potential trading strategies and products. If, for example, a currency suddenly increases in value, or there’s a new bond issuance, the sales team will inform investors and suggest the best course of action.

minus sign
plus sign

Trading

Trading

The actual buying and selling is done by traders, who make markets (give prices) for clients. They work closely with the sales teams to understand the client’s requirements and risk appetite. A trader tends to be an expert in a particular area (e.g. currency or bonds).

minus sign
plus sign

Structuring

Structuring

Structuring teams provide products that are tailored to clients’ specialised needs. They might help an institutional investor achieve a required risk profile, or a corporate looking to acquire new equipment through financing.

minus sign
plus sign

Jargon buster

Sell side

arrow

Investment banks like Deutsche Bank come under the umbrella of ‘sell side’ firms. On this side of the financial market, firms deal with the creation and selling of public and private securities to those on the ‘buy side’ of the industry.

Buy side

arrow

Hedge funds, pension funds and asset managers are all on the buy side. They raise money from investors as well as investing into securities across various asset classes.

Asset class

arrow

The public side of an Investment Bank is home to sales, trading, structuring and research professionals who only deal with publicly available information. The public side will often have business areas split via asset classes – an asset class is a grouping of comparable financial securities like Rates, Credit, FX and Commodities.

Bid/Ask

arrow

When traders put a price on a specific financial product, there are two separate facets to the price. The ‘bid’ is the price at which a trader in the bank is prepared to buy the security (from a participant on the buy side). The ‘ask’ is the price at which a trader in the bank is prepared to sell it. (The ‘ask’ is sometimes called the ‘offer’.)

Securities

arrow

The term securities once referred to paper certificates sent out to investors as proof of an investment. Today, it’s used more broadly as a way of describing the most common types of investments – from stocks and shares to commodities like oil and gold, and bonds. An organisation that sells a security is known as the issuer.

Is Sales & Trading right for you?

It’s the kind of job that many people imagine they’d enjoy, but the reality mightn’t suit everyone. Have you got what it takes?

What is Research?

Research provides financial analysis across various asset classes – a grouping of similar investments. The bank’s research team analyses relevant trends in financial markets, the economy and society as well as highlighting risks and opportunities, and acting as a consultant for clients and stakeholders.

Essentially, Research is about delivering high-quality, independent analysis that helps investors to understand markets and promotes public debate on various issues.

What would you like to see?

Division overview
Jargon busters
What skills you need
What our graduates think

Division overview

Company Research

Company Research

Involves fundamental analysis of companies with the aim to have a view on the share price. An analyst will recommend to buy, sell or hold the shares to their clients.

minus sign
plus sign

Economic Research

Economic Research

It’s important for a bank to know what’s happening in major global economies like the USA and UK – that’s where Economic Research comes in. Analysts here have expertise in a particular area.

minus sign
plus sign

FIC Research

FIC Research

This involves the analysis of interest rates, credit, currencies, and other assets with a view to making a recommendation on investment strategy.

minus sign
plus sign

Thematic Research

Thematic Research

Banks need to be able to advise clients on all sorts of different topics, not just finance. Thematic research involves researching and writing on interesting (and often more abstract) subjects to help inform clients’ decision making. Areas of research could include everything from cryptocurrencies and Environmental, Social and Governance factors through to Covid-19 cases and vaccination rates.

minus sign
plus sign

Jargon buster

Cheap and expensive valuation

arrow

This refers to a stock being either under-priced or over-priced relative to the outlook for a particular company (where the fundamentals may be either better or worse than its competitors). A range of techniques are used to assess valuation.

Bull & Bear

arrow

Bull is an investor who expects prices to rise. Bear is an investor who expects prices to fall.

Chinese wall

arrow

An imaginary barrier which restricts the flow of information between the public side of a business (research, sales, and trading) and the private side (corporate finance, private equity).

Primary & secondary offering

arrow

Primary offering is when a private company taps the markets to raise money – think Uber. Secondary offering is when an existing public company raises more money from investors.

Cloud

arrow

Cloud computing allows users of global banks to access new and upgraded software wherever they’re based, eliminating the need for large, costly IT infrastructure. The speed at which banks can evaluate and adopt new tools and applications can also be hugely increased.

Bonds & Coupons

arrow

Bonds are loans that are a promise by a borrowers like corporates and governments to repay the borrowed amount on an agreed upon interest rate and a fixed payment. Coupons refers to the interest that the borrower of the loan pays to the holder.

Is research right for you?

If you love to get to grips with all sorts of different issues and you’d enjoy turning complex data and information into meaningful insights, Research could be the perfect place for you. Here are some of the skills we look for at Deutsche Bank.

What is Corporate Finance?

Corporate Finance provides strategic advice and capital markets products that help clients build their business. Or to put it another way, they link companies that need money with investors that can provide it.

On behalf of its client, the bank will issue debt or shares, and sell it on the global market to pension funds, mutual funds, hedge funds and private individuals. The money this raises can then be used to fund the client’s growth.

Roles in corporate finance can broadly be divided into two categories; origination teams, who work with clients to understand their needs and identify new business opportunities, and product teams, who develop and execute specialist solutions within capital markets or by providing advice they may require.

What would you like to see?

Division overview
Jargon busters
What skills you need
What our graduates think

Division overview

Mergers and acquisitions

Mergers and acquisitions

In a merger, two companies of roughly similar size join together to create a larger entity, usually under a new name. In an acquisition, a larger company buys and absorbs a smaller one or runs it as a subsidiary. Depending on who they’re acting for, bankers will introduce buyers and sellers of companies to try and make a deal happen.

minus sign
plus sign

Equity capital markets

Equity capital markets

To raise extra money, a business can offer stock – a ‘share’ of itself – for sale to investors on the equity capital market. Capital markets are an essential part of the modern economy, bringing together buyers and sellers of equity assets.

minus sign
plus sign

Leveraged Finance

Leveraged Finance

A way of raising money. Generally, it’s related to an acquisition or asset purchase where a combination of higher yielding (higher interest) loans and bonds are provided as a cheaper way of financing a transaction as opposed to equity or cash.

minus sign
plus sign

Debt capital markets

Debt capital markets

Another means of raising money is through debt – usually in the form of bonds. Bankers working on debt capital markets provide businesses with advice on raising, refinancing, and restructuring this debt.

minus sign
plus sign

Investment Banking Coverage

Investment Banking Coverage

Delivering the most relevant products across advisory, capital markets and risk management products to senior decision makers on the client side. Teams are typically grouped around particular industries (sectors) or geographies and work with clients in these segments.

minus sign
plus sign

Jargon buster

WACC

arrow

Weighted Average Cost of Capital (WACC) is a method for analysing the combination of debt and equity that is most cost effective for the funding needs of a company.

Road Show

arrow

This involves marketing a potential transaction to investors in more than one physical location accompanied by senior management from the company, or conducting these same meetings on a virtual basis.

LBO

arrow

In a leveraged buyout (LBO), one company acquires another relying primarily on debt to pay for the acquisition. The idea is to cheapen the cost versus relying on equity or cash and may result in higher returns if the value of the company increases.

SPAC

arrow

Special Purpose Acquisition Company (SPAC), is a public equity investment where investors provide funding to a management team or investment idea. The funding is then used to acquire a company with investors who are given the choice to continue to hold the company or redeem their investment.

Tombstone

arrow

A graphic included in a marketing presentation, traditionally in a box or ‘tombstone’ format, to highlight recent successful transactions in a related area to provide evidence of why a bank should be chosen.

Is Corporate Finance right for you?

With a diverse range of work and clients all over the world, a career in Corporate Finance offers plenty of opportunities to make an impact. If you want to help build the bank of tomorrow, here are some of the skills we look for at Deutsche Bank.

What is Corporate Banking?

The Corporate Bank partners with clients such as financial institutions, investors and issuers to shape the future of financial services together.

Corporate bankers specialise in offering clients the best products and solutions to make the most of their companies’ financial management. They provide them with services like liquidity management, foreign exchange, payment, trade finance and credit solutions.

It’s a huge and complex business where clients expect the latest technology, personalised advice and the benefits of broader industry expertise.

What would you like to see?

Division overview
Jargon busters
What skills you need
What our graduates think

Division overview

Cash Management

Cash Management

This is about making the most effective use of the bank’s liquidity to help clients with cash flow. The bank can identify client money that’s not doing anything and suggest a place to put it, monitor exposure and reduce an organisation’s risk when cash is tight, and make sure that collections are made from debtors in good time.

minus sign
plus sign

Lending

Lending

Clients want to ensure they can keep their company running, expanding and modernising. They may want to invest in new machines, equipment or in digitalisation. That’s where corporate banking comes in – supporting them with a wide range of financing options for any size of business.

minus sign
plus sign

Trade Finance

Trade Finance

When an importer has to pay for goods upfront, they can find themselves in an exposed position if something goes wrong or gets held up. Trade finance supports the flow of world trade by advancing loans to purchasers and protecting them against the risks that come with prepayment for large transactions.

minus sign
plus sign

Risk Management

Risk Management

When carrying out cross-border business, importers and exporters are exposed to specific risks, such as exchange and currency risks, non-payment, damage to goods in transit and fraud. Corporate banking experts advise them on the best way of reducing these risks.

minus sign
plus sign

Jargon buster

Cash pooling

arrow

An automated physical movement of cash to and from different subsidiary bank accounts into one, centralised ‘header’ bank account on a domestic, regional, or global level. This enables treasurers to benefit from better visibility of cash and simplify cash management structures while avoiding overdrafts and other bank fees.

Corporate Trust

arrow

The provision of agency and other related services to support debt capital markets activity.

Letter of credit (LC)

arrow

An LC is a letter from a bank guaranteeing that a buyer's payment to a seller will be received on time and for the correct amount. If the buyer is then unable to make a payment on the purchase, the bank will be required to cover the full or remaining amount of the purchase.

Custody

arrow

A securities collection and distribution service provided by financial institutions – the institution collects dividends, proceeds and interest from customers’ security sales before distributing them on their behalf.

Corporate Actions

arrow

Events related to holding a security – it could be dividends, coupon payments, bonus issues and takeovers, for example. These can be mandatory (e.g. dividends) or voluntary (e.g. takeovers).

Is Corporate Banking right for you?

With a diverse range of work and clients all over the world, a career in Corporate Banking offers plenty of possibilities. If you want to make an impact, here are some of the skills we look for at Deutsche Bank.

What is Asset Management?

In Asset Management, there’s one key objective: generating income for clients. This is done by directing a client’s capital into a range of investments, chosen carefully by balancing risk, opportunity, and other variables – such as timeframes and other investments in a client’s portfolio.

On behalf of their clients, an Asset Management team might invest in stocks, bonds, property or the foreign exchange to help a client meet their investment goals. These are just some examples of common investments.

What would you like to see?

Division overview
Jargon busters
What skills you need
What our graduates think

Division overview

Within Asset Management, there are two sides to the business:
investments, and client coverage.

Within Asset Management, there are two sides to the business:
investments, and client coverage.

Investments

This is the ‘doing’ arm of Asset Management. Researchers, portfolio managers and traders work here, managing and making investments for clients.

Client Coverage

This arm of Asset Management positions and sells the investment services offered by the bank, and manages relationships with clients.

minus sign
plus sign

Client Coverage

Client Coverage

This is about providing investment services and strategies to help clients invest in a way that will grow their capital. Clients can be either institutional (huge, big money firms) or retail (typically smaller or individual investors).

minus sign
plus sign

Passive Investments

Passive Investments

Passive Investments take a much more long term ‘buy and hold’ strategy, where the idea is to maximise returns by minimising buying and selling. Passive investing builds wealth gradually, rather than seeking to profit from short term price fluctuations in the way that active investing does.
minus sign
plus sign

Active Investments

Active Investments

This involves the active buying and selling of assets such as stocks, bonds and shares. The aim is to take advantage of short-term price movements to beat the stock market’s average returns.
minus sign
plus sign

Alternative Investments

Alternative Investments

Alternative Investments involve assets that don’t fall into one of the traditional asset classes like stocks, bonds and cash. This includes things like Real Estate, Infrastructure, Commodities or Private Equity. These are riskier investments, but can generate high rewards.
minus sign
plus sign

Product development

Product development

This is where new and innovative financial products are developed for clients, getting them to market as well as ensuring they are fit for purpose and in line with all regulatory requirements.
minus sign
plus sign

Jargon buster

AUM

arrow

Assets Under Management is how much money a company is managing. This key metric tells you how big the company is compared to others and also can be used for calculating management fees.

Liquid asset

arrow

This is a financial asset that can be easily converted to cash within a short timeframe, such as stocks and bonds. It’s typically found in active or passive investment strategies.

Illiquid asset

arrow

This tends to be a higher risk asset that cannot easily and readily be sold or exchanged for cash, due to lower trading activity or interest. These types of assets are typically found in alternative investment strategies.

Diversification

arrow

This is a very important part of risk management strategy. Asset managers will often invest in different types of assets – at higher and lower levels of risk – to ‘diversify’ the portfolios they handle and minimise risk.

Yield

arrow

The yield is the amount of money that is earned on an investment. For shares, it’s the annual dividend payment. For property, it’s the rental income as a percentage of the total value of the property. For bonds, it's the annual interest as a percentage of how much they are worth at any given time.

Is Asset Management right for you?

From working with the world’s largest investors, to being at the heart of global events, a career in Asset Management can be as exhilarating as it is rewarding. Find out what skills and qualities we look for to be successful within DWS.

What is Private Banking and Wealth Management?

Individuals with substantial wealth often have complex financial arrangements, and want to make sure that their asset portfolios are generating the best possible returns. They’ll work with a specialist advisor at a bank with in-depth knowledge of financial markets and investment opportunities who will understand their perspective and help them reach their goals.

Wealth managers work in a consultative way, getting advice from appropriate experts and offering appropriate products and solutions.

What would you like to see?

Division overview
Jargon busters
What skills you need
What our graduates think

Division overview

Within Private Banking and Wealth Management, there are two types of services: discretionary or non-discretionary.

Within Private Banking and Wealth Management, there are two types of services: discretionary or non-discretionary.

Discretionary

Clients hand over responsibility for executive portfolio management to the bank.

Non-discretionary

Clients receive advice from the bank, but make final decisions for themselves.

minus sign
plus sign

Relationship managers

Relationship managers

Relationship managers are the main point of contact for clients and are responsible for acquiring new clients too. They create and maintain strong relationships with clients, solving problems and listening to feedback. They will usually be an experienced investment advisor.

minus sign
plus sign

Product specialists

Product specialists

These are typically experts in a particular asset class who will develop investment products and make them available to clients.

minus sign
plus sign

Investment managers

Investment managers

Investment managers act in the market and make decisions by working closely together with the client about where investments are placed. Ultimately, they’re responsible for how clients’ portfolios perform.

minus sign
plus sign

Jargon buster

UHNW

arrow

As the name suggests, Ultra-High-Net-Worth individuals are some of the world’s richest people – they hold investable assets totalling at least $30 million.

Wealth Planning

arrow

Wealth planning is about understanding client objectives and planning strategies that are designed to help protect, grow and effectively manage a client’s wealth.

ESG

arrow

ESG (Environmental Social Governance) are the three factors that make up how sustainable a company is. It includes looking at the environment, social governance, and financial performance. People think this will tell you more about what will happen in the future to a company's finances.

DPM

arrow

Discretionary Portfolio Management (DPM) is when a portfolio manager or investment counsellor makes decisions about what to buy or sell with a client’s money. The term "discretionary" refers to the fact that investment decisions are made at the portfolio manager's discretion.

CBV

arrow

Client business volume (CBV) is a measurement of a client’s business that takes invested assets, sight deposits and loans into consideration.

Is Private Banking and Wealth Management right for you?

Managing the assets of some of the world’s wealthiest people is a fulfilling and challenging job – but their expectations can be high. Some of the skills we look for at Deutsche Bank include:

What is Retail Banking?

Retail provides products and services like loans, mortgages and current accounts to individuals and small companies. It’s the kind of banking we think we all know, but there’s much more to it than high-street branches and call centres. It’s a huge, complex and competitive business where customers want the latest digital technology without losing access to personal advice.

Opportunities in retail range from front-line customer service and branch management to relationship management and product development. People with aptitude can progress quickly and will get the chance to study for professional qualifications.

What would you like to see?

Division overview
Jargon busters
What skills you need

Division overview

Customer service

Customer service

Working on the counter at a branch or in a contact centre, customer service teams are the first point of contact for the bank’s retail customers. They help with queries and problems, and refer them to the appropriate specialists.

minus sign
plus sign

Product development

Product development

Product development teams make sure that the bank’s range of services – like credit cards, savings accounts and insurance – meets the changing demands of its customer base and are marketed appropriately.

minus sign
plus sign

Branch management

Branch management

Branch managers are responsible for the commercial performance of their business unit, managing in-branch recruitment, setting targets for junior staff, and reporting on activity to the wider bank.

minus sign
plus sign

Strategy

Strategy

Strategy specialists analyse market conditions and competitor activity to see where the bank could gain an advantage. They also review the bank’s performance against its targets and produce reports and insight.

minus sign
plus sign

Jargon buster

Targets

arrow

Bank branches will be set financial targets by head office, which they'll try to meet by making money on the products that are sold – all while still providing excellent customer service.

POA

arrow

Power of attorney is when someone is given third party control over an account.

Credit

arrow

Retail banks are an important source of credit for people. They give you money in the form of loans, credit cards and mortgages, to buy big things like houses and cars. Credit is an important because it helps the economy to grow.

AML

arrow

Anti-Money Laundering is about understanding and recognising the techniques criminals will use to gain benefit from the money they make from their crimes.

Is Retail Banking right for you?

Retail Banking is fast-paced and you are often seen as the face of the Bank if you work in branch. Find out the kind of attributes you’ll need to be a success.

What is Technology in Banking?

The right technology can give one bank the edge over the competition and plays a big part in compliance with regulations that continue to evolve. It’s now less to do with IT support, but rather about emerging trends set to transform the industry like Blockchain and AI, and the increasing significance of the Cloud. That’s why institutions invest vast sums in tech and employ tens of thousands of people to develop and maintain it.

It’s most evident on the trading floor, where it makes trades faster, more competitive, and more profitable. But technology, and making technology better, is crucial to every part of a bank.

What would you like to see?

Division overview
Jargon busters
What skills you need
What our graduates think

Division overview

Engineers

Engineers

Engineers create new applications and software to be used by the bank, or adapt software that’s been acquired from a third party to the needs of their institution. They work on everything from retail customer-facing mobile banking apps to applications that use financial modelling to help traders make better decisions.

minus sign
plus sign

Information Security

Information Security

Information Security identifies and evaluates data security threats and finds ways to manage, deter and remove them. This involves monitoring, analysing, developing and supporting security controls, and managing disaster recovery plans.

minus sign
plus sign

QA Testing

QA Testing

Analysing requirements, writing test cases, and creating test data are just a few things Quality Assurance (QA) Testing teams do to ensure products uphold the highest standards. From planning and strategy to analysis and reporting, this team watches their work come to life in a way that drives banking forward.

minus sign
plus sign

Business Analysts & Project Managers

Business Analysts & Project Managers

Business Analysts assess existing systems and develop proposals for new requirements. Project Managers will manage all stages of the activity through development, running a team of engineers and dealing with third-party suppliers. It’s up to these individuals to troubleshoot problems that come up in testing, and hand over a robust new product to the rest of the business.

minus sign
plus sign

Service Management

Service Management

Service Management teams are hands-on technicians, supporting the banks functional teams and leveraging their expertise to ensure best-in-class Service Management. From monitoring and tracking production data to supporting the resolution of issues, their insights and input help advance the banking industry.

minus sign
plus sign

Data Scientists

Data Scientists

Data Scientists design and develop algorithms, implement technical solutions, and configure applications. From participating in the design and architecture of data science solutions to exploring technologies to be used, they contribute to the creation of the data science body of knowledge and represent the bank as a data science practitioner in industry initiatives.

minus sign
plus sign

Jargon buster

ML

arrow

Machine Learning (ML) is all about finding patterns in data and using those patterns to predict the future.

AI

arrow

Artificial intelligence (AI) is transforming banking operations, reducing response times to customer queries, improving fraud detection, and automating investment decisions by aggregating thousands of variables and potential outcomes in seconds.

Big data

arrow

This is a term that describes a very large volume of information that is difficult to process using traditional methods. This data can be used to analyse trends and in some ways improve customer satisfaction with things like personalised suggestions.

Quantum computing

arrow

Quantum computers can process information much faster and more efficiently than traditional computers. These computers are based on quantum mechanics and can solve complex problems that even the most powerful supercomputers cannot solve.

Cloud

arrow

Cloud computing allows users of global banks to access new and upgraded software wherever they’re based, eliminating the need for large, costly IT infrastructure. The speed at which banks can evaluate and adopt new tools and applications can also be hugely increased.

Blockchain

arrow

Blockchain is a system that records information in a way that makes it difficult to change, hack, or cheat the system. It's like a digital ledger of transactions. Each block in the chain contains many transactions, and every time a new transaction occurs on the blockchain, they have to be updated everywhere at once.

Is Technology right for you?

Technology is shaping our industry at rapid pace, unlocking new possibilities in finance, and reimagining what banks can be. If you want to transform the future of banking, these are the skills we look for at Deutsche Bank.

What is Infrastructure?

Front-line banking is made possible by a diverse mix of specialists in infrastructure and support roles. Like every large business, banks have people responsible for human resources and accounting, as well as functions specific to financial services like risk and regulation. Some will have begun their careers in banking, but many will have crossed over from a similar role in a different industry. And as banks become more heavily regulated, they depend more on teams of specialists in compliance.

What would you like to see?

Division overview
Jargon busters
What skills you need
What our graduates think

Division overview

What is Regulation, Compliance and Anti-financial Crime?

What is Regulation, Compliance and Anti-financial Crime?

While Anti-Financial Crime concentrates on keeping the bank to the letter of the law, compliance focuses on the operational side of the bank’s activities, ensuring that it’s working in line with the regulations that govern financial services businesses in the countries where it does business. Areas of responsibility include:

  • Regulator management: building a relationship with regulators to ensure banks are complying and accurately responding to regulatory requests
  • Anti-financial crime: adherence and policy management for anti-fraud, bribery & corruption, anti-money laundering and sanctions & embargoes
  • Training: Global delivery of mandatory bank-wide training for employees on key compliance topics
  • Legal responsibilities: keeping banks appraised and compliant with all new regulations and laws around the world
  • Surveillance and monitoring: watching bank-wide activity for questionable behaviour
minus sign
plus sign

What is Human Resources?

What is Human Resources?

Human Resources (HR) makes operational and strategic decisions about the bank’s current and future workforce, attracting, recruiting and retaining talented people, making sure they’re properly trained and ensuring that people are treated fairly. Their main areas of responsibility include:

  • Recruitment: hiring the best employees to meet the demands of the business
  • Training & Development: ensuring employees have access to training and development opportunities throughout their careers
  • Compensation and benefits: managing salaries, perks and bonuses
  • Employee relations: resolving disputes while observing correct processes
  • HR advice: acting as consultants on strategic HR issues to senior management
  • Regulation & governance: setting and communicating company rules and procedures
  • Internal mobility & redeployment: creating opportunities to retain and redeploy talented employees
minus sign
plus sign

What is Operations?

What is Operations?

Operations makes sure the bank’s business is carried out efficiently, on time, and without risk. It’s largely concerned with Sales & Trading, and the millions of transactions that take place there every day. Its main responsibilities include:

  • Trade processing and support: clearing, settling and documenting every trade
  • Market: promoting smooth internal data communication
  • Investment: supervising and servicing activities while reporting on transactions
  • Client Service: advising and communicating with clients on transactions they’ve made with the bank
minus sign
plus sign

What is Legal?

What is Legal?

Banks make millions of transactions and trades every day. The laws governing financial services activity are complex and change frequently; banks have Legal teams to protect their financial well-being and reputation, and to evaluate the risks associated with their activities. Typical work includes:

  • Employment law: supervises employee-related legal matters and litigation
  • Intelligence: research and due diligence on legal risks to the bank’s business
  • Litigation and arbitration: handles legal proceedings that involve the bank
minus sign
plus sign

What is Finance?

What is Finance?

Branch managers are responsible for the commercial performance of their business unit, managing in-branch recruitment, setting targets for junior staff, and reporting on activity to the wider bank.

  • Business control: running processes that promote efficiency and profitability
  • Reporting: providing data to regulators
  • Risk control: making sure the bank doesn’t expose itself to unnecessary risk
  • Valuation: setting prices for the bank’s products and services
minus sign
plus sign

What is Risk Management?

What is Risk Management?

Market crashes, IT failures, even wars and natural disasters – risk management’s role is to predict the likelihood and potential impact on the business of something going wrong and put guidelines and procedures in place to help the bank recover. Roles in risk management include:

  • Credit: working on the bank’s internal credit approval and monitoring service
  • Market: studying shifts in the market and assessing their impact on the bank’s trading
  • Investment: assessing risks associated with entities the bank buys or invests in
  • Operational: assessing internal risks like system failures and fraud
minus sign
plus sign

What is Treasury?

What is Treasury?

In simple terms, a bank’s Treasury is responsible for looking after its money. This means making sure there’s cash available when it’s needed and that funds can be raised to help the bank meet its obligations and do business in the normal way. It focuses on:

  • Liquidity: converting assets into cash without incurring a loss, and stress testing to make sure the bank’s position is secure enough to weather a sudden shift in the economy
  • Capital: managing the bank’s cash and getting it to where it’s needed
  • Funding: raising extra funds for the bank – for example by issuing bonds
minus sign
plus sign

What is Group Audit?

What is Group Audit?

Group Audit has an integral role in the achievement of a bank’s strategic goals and is responsible for examining, evaluating and reporting on the design and effectiveness of internal operational systems, as well as risk management and governance processes. Work here involves:

  • Assisting the bank’s businesses: and infrastructure functions to identify and control weaknesses.
  • Advising: with a high profile in the bank, Group Audit acts as an independent and forward looking challenger and adviser to Senior Management on any issues and occurrences and are increasingly consulted for advice by the regulators.
minus sign
plus sign

Jargon buster

AML

arrow

Anti-Money Laundering refers to the policies, laws, and regulations to implement in order to prevent financial crimes.

ERM

arrow

Enterprise risk management is what a company does to manage business risks.

KYC

arrow

Know Your Customer. This is all about having enough data and information to understand how customers behave in order to identify any suspicious activity on their account.

EBITDA

arrow

EBITDA stands for ‘Earnings Before Interest, Tax, Depreciation and Amortisation’. This is the percentage of profit a company makes before taking away certain things like tax charges. These things can make it hard to know how well a company is really doing.

Lines of defense

arrow

This is a framework that outlines internal audit’s role in assuring the effective management of risk. The first line of defence includes functions that own and manage risks, the second line of defence are functions that deal with compliance, the third line of defence are functions that provide independent assurance.

Is an Infrastructure role right for you?

Depending on the role or area you’re interested in, certain skills may be more useful than others. At Deutsche Bank, there’s no specific type of person we look for. Wherever you work, you’ll enjoy an environment that will bring out the best in you.

Privacy Notice

At Deutsche Bank we recognise the importance of personal information entrusted to us. It is one of our fundamental responsibilities as a bank to ensure that we protect the information entrusted to us by our clients and our website visitors. Please find below select security measures we established to protect your privacy

Why does Deutsche Bank collect personal information?

We collect, process, and use personal information on our websites in order to offer you even better products and services, best adapt our business processes to our clients’ needs, and steer you to the most suitable product information and online banking applications.

How is information collected and how long is it retained?

arrow

Information collected on our website will only be retained for as long as necessary to fulfil the purpose for which it was collected. If you wish to access or correct any information Deutsche Bank AG holds about you, you may have your data deleted, blocked or corrected (as long as compliant with applicable law). You have the right to access the personal information we hold about you; this service is free of charge.

What information is collected and how is it used?

arrow

  • Data tracking
    Tracking information includes details of the originating page that you used to access the Deutsche Bank website including the search requests you may have made when using a search engine. Details of the Deutsche Bank websites you visited and which search terms you may have used on the website are also collected, as well as additional information about website errors, website scrolling and the volume of data transferred between your browser and the web server.
  • Length of stay
    We record the duration of your visit by processing when your visit started and came to an end as well as the network activity time, pop-up display time and the time that any errors occurred.
  • Pseudonymised IDs
    Your pseudonymised IDs (uniquely identifiable number combinations) are stored In order to identify you as a repeat visitor to our website.
  • Session information
    Besides temporary session IDs, with which your visit can be assigned via several subpages, your session information also includes the duration of the session.
  • Campaign information
    Campaign information comprises the advertising media you have clicked on, where it is located and which marketing campaign it belongs to.
  • Loading times
    The information collected includes the time taken for images and the whole website to load, as well as the time at which the website was loaded completely and the time spent on the website.
  • Location information
    Where available, we collect information about the postcode, town, country, longitude, latitude and time zone of your visit.
  • System information
    The information about the system with which you visit the website, including the display resolution, the operating system and browser used, network and connection information, the end device used, information about cookies, flash and JavaScript as well as the language setting, your domain, the IP address (shortened) and where applicable your organisation (if available)
    We use the information collected on our websites to compile user profiles using pseudonyms. These pseudonymised user profiles do not allow any of your personal details to be identified. You can opt out of your information being collected by using the “Analytics & Re-Marketing Opt-out” link further down this page. Without your explicit consent this tracking information will not be combined with your personal information.

How is information retained, protected and used?

arrow

Information input collected through this website will be transferred to the responsible Deutsche Bank AG division. Banking secrecy as well as confidentiality are maintained. Data will not be transferred to third parties, unless necessary to answer your queries (i.e. leaflets dispatched by vendors). Your information is used to exclusively fulfil the purpose for which it is collected, relating to the website through which it is collected.
Websites through which we collect your information are usually encoded using the encryption module of your browser. These sites are certified by renowned institutions for international encryption technique, analogous to Deutsche Bank’s Internet Banking. Moreover, Deutsche Bank AG put in place additional and comprehensive state-of-the-art security measures when both accounts and custody accounts are accessed via the Internet. Firewalls prevent unauthorized access.
Diverse encryption and identification layers protect customer information from intrusion or disclosure to third parties during data transfer. Furthermore, Deutsche Bank AG internally uses sophisticated encoding methods in order to prevent de-coding by unauthorised persons. Moreover, an electronic identifier is generated during data transfer to safeguard your information.

Data privacy notices and EU General Data Protection Regulation

arrow

In addition to this website-specific privacy notice, further data privacy information, as required by the EU General Data Protection Regulation under A. X. in German and English.

Data privacy notes on social plugins

arrow

Our website uses social plugins (“plugins”) from the social networking sites Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn and XING. If you access a Deutsche Bank website using such a plugin, your browser will contact the server of the underlying social networking site, load the visual presentation of the plugin, and present it to you.
While this is happening, the social networking site receives information concerning your visit to our website, as well as further data such as your IP address. In order to ensure an appropriate level of data privacy in connection with our internet presence, we have deactivated the respective plugins with a button and placed a short data privacy note that can be consulted before a plugin is activated.
Our website also contains links to the social networking sites like Facebook, Flickr, Instagram, LinkedIn, Twitter, XING or YouTube. We have no influence on the data that social networking sites collect via an active plugin or via a link. For more information, please consult the relevant data privacy notice:

Cookies

arrow

In view of the importance of data privacy, and our obligations of transparency, we provide information below about cookies, how we use them on our website.
What are cookies?
Cookies are small text files that are sent to your computer to ensure the technical functionality of the website. Deutsche Bank uses cookies in some areas of its web pages to make it easier for you to use the pages and to make them more personalized.
What are cookies?
When trying to understand cookies, it can help to know following terminology:

  • Cookies installed on your device by the organization running the website you are visiting are known as “first party” cookies.
  • Cookies installed on your device via the website you are visiting by another organization are termed “third party” cookies. An example is a cookie set by a specialist website analytics company that provides the website owner with data on the numbers of people visiting its website (Cookies for range and usage analysis).
  • So-called “persistent cookies” remain on your device even after you close your internet browser. They are activated each time you visit the website that created that particular cookie. For example, where a "persistent cookie" is used on a website to remember your login details, you will not need to enter those details each time you visit that website (Functional and preference cookies).
  • Session cookies, by contrast, are temporary and are typically used to enable the website to operate, e.g. by permitting a user to move from page to page without having to log in again. Once you close your browser, all session cookies are deleted (Technically necessary cookies).
  • Flash cookies are installed by websites that contain media (e.g. video clips). Adobe Flash software is required for this. This allows content to be downloaded more quickly and information to be stored, for example that the content has been accessed from your device (Functional and preference cookies).


What cookies do we use?
This website only uses cookies that are necessary for the technical functionality of our website and the recognition of errors and security relevant conspicuous features or to offer a service or functionality requested by you; e.g. a cookie that "remembers" your personal settings such as selected language or similar. Marketing cookies and other cookies requiring your consent are not used on this site.
The following technically necessary cookies are used.

Cookie namePurpose of useClassLifetimeTypeProcessing company
ioMarketingOptionalEnd of SessionPersistentWebtrekk GmbH
wt_rlaMarketingOptional1 monthsPersistentWebtrekk GmbH


How to control cookies
Some cookies allow you to take full advantage of the functionality of our website. In order to offer certain functionalities, certain technically necessary cookies can be used to display these functionalities correctly.
You can set your web browser to disable cookies. Please note that most browsers offer different ways to protect your privacy. If you do not activate or deactivate certain cookies via the browser settings, it is possible that certain functionalities will not be available to you as expected. For example, you can allow first-party cookies, but block third-party cookies, or receive a notification each time a website wants to install a cookie.
Please note that if you disable cookies in this way, you will not be able to set new cookies. However, it will not prevent previously set cookies from continuing to work on your device until you clear all cookies in your browser settings. Instructions for managing cookies on your browser can usually be found under the browser's help function or in the operating instructions for your smartphone.

If you feel that the above is not sufficient or if you have any queries as regards the collection, processing or use of your information we are looking forward to hearing from you. We will make every effort to reply as soon as possible and take into consideration any suggestions from your end.
For inquiries about the personal data of yours that we hold, please use the following PDF German language form(PDF) or contact us at data.privacy@db.com.

If you feel that the above is not sufficient or if you have any queries as regards the collection, processing or use of your information we are looking forward to hearing from you. We will make every effort to reply as soon as possible and take into consideration any suggestions from your end.


For inquiries about the personal data of yours that we hold, please use the following PDF German language form(PDF) or contact us at data.privacy@db.com.

Webtrekk